Friday, September 20, 2019

The Great State O' Maine celebrates 200 years of statehood!


In July 1819, Maine voters opted to separate from Massachusetts, and a constitutional convention was held in October of that year. The proposedconstitution won voter approval the following January, and Maine became the 23rd state on March 15, 1820. In honor of the Pine Tree State’s 200th anniversary of statehood, I’m posting Maine-related photos and images.

Moody's Diner, Waldoboro

Today in the history of the American comic strip: September 20


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

9.20.1901: Gus Edson, co-creator of Dondi (1955-1986), is born in Cincinnati, Ohio.

9.20.1920: Winnie Winkle makes its debut as Winnie Winkle the Breadwinner. The strip survived until 1996.


9.20.1962: Bill Amend, the creator of FoxTrot, is born in Northampton, Massachusetts. He was named 2006 Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year by the National Cartoonists Society.


9.20.1964: Ben Casey, already in print as a daily strip, adds a Sunday installment. Both strips ended in 1966.


9.20.1965: Bob Weber debuts Moose, later known as Moose and Molly. Moose is a lazy, out-of-work loafer and Molly is his extremely tolerant wife.
 

9.20.1972: William Ritt, co-creator of the Brick Bradford science fiction strip, which ran from 1933 to 1987, dies at 70.

9.20.2010: Ed Stein unveils Freshly Squeezed, a cartoon about multi-generational families.


Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.

"What is art but a way of seeing?" Saul Bellow

"Sunset, Long Island," 1939, Georgia O'Keeffe

Movie Posters, 1955: Two adults, please, and a large popcorn


Editorial cartoonists: keeping the legacy of Thomas Nast alive

Matt Wuerker

Journalist H.L. Mencken and the presidency of Donald J. Trump


"As democracy is perfected, the office represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. We move toward a lofty ideal. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron."

 July 26, 1920
H. L. Mencken, Baltimore Evening Sun
 ~ ~ ~
September 20, 2019
 Another great and glorious day with a downright moron adorning the White House. 

Thursday, September 19, 2019

The Great State O' Maine celebrates 200 years of statehood!


In July 1819, Maine voters opted to separate from Massachusetts, and a constitutional convention was held in October of that year. The proposed constitution won voter approval the following January, and Maine became the 23rd state on March 15, 1820. In honor of the Pine Tree State’s 200th anniversary of statehood, I’m posting Maine-related photos and images.

Today in the history of the American comic strip: September 19


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

9.19.1872: A. D. Condo is born in Freeport, Illinois. He collaborated with J. W. Raper to create The Outbursts of Everett True (1905-1927). He also created Mr. Skygack, from Mars (1907-1917), which is considered the first science fiction comic.

9.19.1949:
Casey Ruggles, a Sunday-only Western strip for the past few months, adds a daily strip. The comic survived until 1954.


9.19.2010: The illustrator of Inside Woody Allen, Stuart Hample, dies in New York City. He was 84. As its name suggests, the strip focused on Allen's quirks and foibles. It ran from 1976 to 1984.

Casey Ruggles

Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.