Monday, August 10, 2020

The New Yorker covers: May 30, 2005


Over the years, there have been many magazines whose covers have featured the work of highly talented artists and illustrators. But probably no magazine has had more varied and memorable covers, over a longer period of time, than The New Yorkerwhich was founded in 1925. Yes, there have been some duds. Some covers have not aged well. But many New Yorker covers are stunning, no matter how old. Witty. Whimsical. Poignant. Pointed. Or some combination thereof.

"The Song of Spring," by Peter de Sève

The Great State O' Maine celebrates 200 years of statehood!


In July 1819, Maine voters opted to separate from Massachusetts, and a constitutional convention was held in October of that year. The proposed constitution won voter approval the following January, and Maine became the 23rd state on March 15, 1820. In honor of the Pine Tree State’s 200th anniversary of statehood, I’m posting Maine-related photos and images.


Scott (1883-1983) and Helen (1904-1995) Nearing

Today in the history of the American comic strip: August 10


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

8.10.1990: Peggy Jean becomes Charlie Brown’s girlfriend in Peanuts, despite his unrequited love for the Little Red-Haired Girl. Peggy Jean appeared intermittently in the comic until mid-1999, a few months before the strip ended in February 2000.


Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.

"What is art but a way of seeing?" Saul Bellow

“Hound in Field,” 1958, Alex Colville

Movie Posters, 1929: Two adults, please, and a large popcorn!


Sunday, August 9, 2020

The New Yorker covers: June 15, 1998


Over the years, there have been many magazines whose covers have featured the work of highly talented artists and illustrators. But probably no magazine has had more varied and memorable covers, over a longer period of time, than The New Yorkerwhich was founded in 1925. Yes, there have been some duds. Some covers have not aged well. But many New Yorker covers are stunning, no matter how old. Witty. Whimsical. Poignant. Pointed. Or some combination thereof.

"And Forsaking All Others," by Edward Sorel

The Great State O' Maine celebrates 200 years of statehood!


In July 1819, Maine voters opted to separate from Massachusetts, and a constitutional convention was held in October of that year. The proposed constitution won voter approval the following January, and Maine became the 23rd state on March 15, 1820. In honor of the Pine Tree State’s 200th anniversary of statehood, I’m posting Maine-related photos and images.


William King (1768-1852)

Today in the history of the American comic strip: August 9


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

8.9.1964: Fontaine Fox, creator of the classic comic Toonerville Folks (1908-1955), dies in Greenwich, Connecticut, at 80.

8.9.1991: Pasquale, the lovable tyke in Rose Is Rose, finally grows out of baby talk. The strip launched in 1984.


Toonerville Folks

Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.