Wednesday, June 19, 2019

Vintage Mags, 1914: a look back at old magazine covers

Today in the history of the American comic strip: June 19


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

6.19.1923: Moon Mullins debuts, under the stewardship of Frank Willard. The strip remained in syndication until 1991.

6.19.1978: Garfield, arguably the world’s most famous cat, makes his first appearance in print, courtesy of creator Jim Davis.

6.19.2015: Ben Schwartz writes an article for The New Yorker about Frank King’s Gasoline Alley, headlined “An old comic strip about modern fatherhood.”

6.19.2018: National Public Radio’s All Things Considered runs a story on the growing popularity of Wallace the Brave, a three-year-old strip by Will Henry of Rhode Island, who set the cartoon in the fictional coastal town of Snug Harbor. The report said the comic is about “a boy who's less depressed than Peanuts character Charlie Brown,” and kinder than Calvin of Calvin & Hobbes.

Garfield

Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.

"What is art but a way of seeing?" Saul Bellow

“Familia,” 1925, Tarsila do Amaral

Movie Posters, 1924: Two adults, please, and a large popcorn!


Editorial cartoonists: keeping the legacy of Thomas Nast alive

Matt Davies

Journalist H.L. Mencken and the presidency of Donald Trump


"As democracy is perfected, the office represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. We move toward a lofty ideal. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron."

 July 26, 1920
H. L. Mencken, Baltimore Evening Sun
 ~ ~ ~
June 19, 2019
 Another great and glorious day with a downright moron adorning the White House. 

Tuesday, June 18, 2019

Vintage Mags, 1918: a look back at old magazine covers

Today in the history of the American comic strip: June 18


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

6.18.1954: Editor, publisher, and designer Dean Mullaney is born. He established The Library of American Comics at IDW Publishing, to produce hardcover collections of comic strips. The imprint debuted with the 2007 book The Complete Terry and the Pirates, Vol. 1: 1934-1936, by Milton Caniff.

6.18.1981: Joanie Caucus and Rick Redfern marry in Garry Trudeau's Doonesbury.

6.18.1982: The musical film Annie is released. It was adapted from the Broadway musical of the same name, which in turn was based on Harold Gray’s comic strip, Little Orphan Annie.


6.18.2000:
Jules Feiffer’s strip Feiffer ends its run after more than 40 years. Originally titled Sick Sick Sick, it became Feiffer's Fables and then, finally, Feiffer.


6.18.2013: The Library of American Comics releases Tarzan: The Complete Russ Manning Newspaper Strips, Vol. 1 (1967-1969)launching a four-volume set.

Feiffer


Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.