Friday, April 16, 2021

The birth of an artist: April 16

 

Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun
April 16, 1755

Dorothy P. Lathrop
April 16, 1891

Garth Williams
April 16, 1912

Fortunino Matania
April 16, 1881

The New Yorker covers: January 17, 1953

 

Over the years, there have been many magazines whose covers have featured the work of highly talented artists and illustrators. But probably no magazine has had more varied and memorable covers, over a longer period of time, than The New Yorker, which was founded in 1925.
 
Abe Birnbaum
(covers untitled until February 1993)

Today in the history of the American comic strip: April 16


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

4.16.1938: Keeping Up with the Joneses is discontinued after 25 years. Created by Arthur R. Momand, the comic popularized the term “keeping up with the Joneses” as a way to gauge personal success by tracking how well the neighbors are doing.

4.16.1964:
Lalo Alcaraz is born in San Diego, California. He launched La Cucaracha, a politically themed Latino strip, in 2002.

4.16.1984: Pat Brady debuts Rose Is Rose, which revolves around Rose and Jimbo Gumbo, their son Pasquale, and the family cat, Peekaboo.

4.16.1989: Scott Adams’ Dilbert starts its run, giving frustrated office workers everywhere someone to relate to. The National Cartoonists Society honored Adams with its Newspaper Comic Strip award in 1997.

4.16.1999: Charles Edson “Chuck” McKimson Jr. dies in Los Angeles, California, at 84. Best known as an animator, he drew the Roy Rogers comic strip from 1949 to 1953, in collaboration with his brother Thomas and artist Pete Alvarado.
 

Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.

"What is art but a way of seeing?" Saul Bellow

"Blinking in the Sun" (Cat in a Cottage Window), 1881, Ralph Hedley

Movie Posters, 1941: Two adults, please, and a large popcorn!


Thursday, April 15, 2021

The birth of an artist: April 15


Jan van Huysum
April 15, 1682

Thomas Hart Benton
April 15, 1889

Arshile Gorky
April 15, 1904


Olga Boznanska
April 15, 1865


Elizabeth Catlett
April 15, 1915


Charles Willson Peale
April 15, 1741

Théodore Rousseau
April 15, 1812

Heinrich Kley
April 15, 1863

The New Yorker covers: May 25, 1946

 

Over the years, there have been many magazines whose covers have featured the work of highly talented artists and illustrators. But probably no magazine has had more varied and memorable covers, over a longer period of time, than The New Yorker, which was founded in 1925.

Rea Irvin
(covers untitled until February 1993)

Today in the history of the American comic strip: April 15


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

4.15.1890: The creator of Barney Google and Snuffy Smith, Billy DeBeck, is born in Chicago, Illinois.

4.15.1934: Blondie and Dagwood celebrate the birth of their first child, Alexander Bumstead, in the Blondie comic strip.
 
4.15.1946: Ed Dodd launches Mark Trail, an adventure strip with an ecological bent that remains in print.

4.15.1951: Wiley Miller, the creator of Non Sequitur, is born in Burbank, California. He was named 2013 Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year by the National Cartoonists Society.

4.15.1968: Los Angeles school teacher Harriet Glickman writes to Peanuts creator Charles M. Schulz urging him to introduce a black character in the strip. A correspondence followed, and Schulz added an African-American boy named Franklin in July 1968.
 
4.15.1978: Big Ben Bolt, which debuted in 1950, comes to an end. The title character was a boxer and, later on, a journalist.

4.15.2001: Johnny Hart’s B.C. triggers controversy when an Easter strip depicts the last words of Jesus and shows a menorah transforming into a cross.

4.15.2007: Brant Parker, who co-created The Wizard of Id with Johnny Hart and Crock with Bill Rechin, dies in Lynchburg, Virginia at 86.

4.15.2014: Dark Horse Books releases Alley Oop: The Complete Sundays Volume 1 (1934-1936), which is billed as the first in a series reprinting all of the strip’s Sunday pages.

Big Ben Bolt

Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.