Monday, January 20, 2020

The New Yorker covers: May 30, 2011


Over the years, there have been many magazines whose covers have featured the work of highly talented artists and illustrations. But probably no magazine has had more varied and memorable covers, over a longer period of time, than The New Yorker, which was founded in 1925. Yes, there have been some duds. Some covers have not aged well. But many New Yorker covers are stunning, no matter how old. Witty. Whimsical. Poignant. Pointed. Or some combination thereof. 

"Small Growers," by Peter de Sève

The Great State O' Maine celebrates 200 years of statehood!


In July 1819, Maine voters opted to separate from Massachusetts, and a constitutional convention was held in October of that year. The proposed constitution won voter approval the following January, and Maine became the 23rd state on March 15, 1820. In honor of the Pine Tree State’s 200th anniversary of statehood, I’m posting Maine-related photos and images.


Spring Point Ledge Light, South Portland (Jack Milton)

Today in the history of the American comic strip: January 20


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.


1.20.1894: Harold Gray, the creator of Little Orphan Annie, is born in Kankakee, Illinois. His strip made its debut in 1924.

1.20.1901: Comics pioneer Frederick Burr Opper, the creator of Happy Hooligan, rolls out Our Antediluvian Ancestors, a short-lived cave man strip.

1.20.1944: Bill Griffith is born in New York City. His strip Zippy takes its name from its lead character, Zippy the Pinhead.


Little Orphan Annie

Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.

"What is art but a way of seeing?" Saul Bellow

"The Piazzetta, Venice," ca. 1904, John Singer Sargent

Movie Posters, 1935: Two adults, please, and a large popcorn!


Sunday, January 19, 2020

The New Yorker covers: January 23 & 30, 2006


Over the years, there have been many magazines whose covers have featured the work of highly talented artists and illustrations. But probably no magazine has had more varied and memorable covers, over a longer period of time, than The New Yorker, which was founded in 1925. Yes, there have been some duds. Some covers have not aged well. But many New Yorker covers are stunning, no matter how old. Witty. Whimsical. Poignant. Pointed. Or some combination thereof. 

"Sleeping with Your Cat," by Gahan Wilson

Maine's Common Ground Country Fair posters: 2020


Since 1977, the Maine Organic Farmers and Gardeners Association, more commonly known as MOFGA, has held an annual Common Ground Country Fair. And each year, it has commissioned a poster for the event. In the early going, these posters were heavy on text and short on graphics, more informational than artistic. But since the 1980s, they have evolved into lovely, highly popular illustrations that, nowadays, also turn up on T-shirts and other apparel.

The Great State O' Maine celebrates 200 years of statehood!


In July 1819, Maine voters opted to separate from Massachusetts, and a constitutional convention was held in October of that year. The proposed constitution won voter approval the following January, and Maine became the 23rd state on March 15, 1820. In honor of the Pine Tree State’s 200th anniversary of statehood, I’m posting Maine-related photos and images.


A1 Diner, Gardiner