Tuesday, February 25, 2020

The New Yorker covers: May 6, 1972


Over the years, there have been many magazines whose covers have featured the work of highly talented artists and illustrations. But probably no magazine has had more varied and memorable covers, over a longer period of time, than The New Yorkerwhich was founded in 1925. Yes, there have been some duds. Some covers have not aged well. But many New Yorker covers are stunning, no matter how old. Witty. Whimsical. Poignant. Pointed. Or some combination thereof.

by Ronald Searle
(covers untitled until February 1993)

The Great State O' Maine celebrates 200 years of statehood!


In July 1819, Maine voters opted to separate from Massachusetts, and a constitutional convention was held in October of that year. The proposed constitution won voter approval the following January, and Maine became the 23rd state on March 15, 1820. In honor of the Pine Tree State’s 200th anniversary of statehood, I’m posting Maine-related photos and images.

Today in the history of the American comic strip: February 25


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

2.25.1903: Darrell McClure, who worked on Little Annie Rooney from 1930 to 1966, is born in Ukiah, California. The strip about a young orphaned girl and her dog Zero was launched in 1927, after Little Orphan Annie became a hit.

2.25.1929: Illustrator and cartoonist Arnold Roth is born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 1959, he introduced Poor Arnold’s Almanac, which ran until 1961, and again from 1989 to 1990. John Updike once wrote: “All cartoonists are geniuses, but Arnold Roth is especially so.” Roth is a member of the National Cartoonists Society Hall of Fame.

2.25.1973: Terry and the Pirates ends its run of close to 40 years. Creator Milton Caniff launched the adventure strip in 1934 and left it in 1946, but successor George Wunder kept it going until 1973.


2.25. 2013: Stephan Pastis, the creator of Pearls Before Swine, releases his first children’s book: Timmy Failure: Mistakes Were Made.
 


Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.

"What is art but a way of seeing?" Saul Bellow

"Corn and Winter Wheat," 1948, Thomas Hart Benton

Movie Posters, 2014: Two adults, please, and a large popcorn!


Monday, February 24, 2020

The New Yorker covers: March 2, 2020


Over the years, there have been many magazines whose covers have featured the work of highly talented artists and illustrations. But probably no magazine has had more varied and memorable covers, over a longer period of time, than The New Yorkerwhich was founded in 1925. Yes, there have been some duds. Some covers have not aged well. But many New Yorker covers are stunning, no matter how old. Witty. Whimsical. Poignant. Pointed. Or some combination thereof.

"All That Money Can Buy," by Barry Blitt

The Great State O' Maine celebrates 200 years of statehood!


In July 1819, Maine voters opted to separate from Massachusetts, and a constitutional convention was held in October of that year. The proposed constitution won voter approval the following January, and Maine became the 23rd state on March 15, 1820. In honor of the Pine Tree State’s 200th anniversary of statehood, I’m posting Maine-related photos and images.

John Ford (1894-1973)

Today in the history of the American comic strip: February 24


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

2.24.1954: Jim Borgman, the co-creator of Zits (with Jerry Scott), is born in Cincinnati, Ohio. Borgman was the editorial cartoonist at The Cincinnati Enquirer from 1976 to 2008. Launched in 1997, Zits stars high schooler Jeremy Duncan as he copes with family, friends, romance and school.


Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.