Saturday, April 29, 2017

The artful archive: a look at magazine covers through the years

1926

"Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead!"

It’s time for a pop quiz on history, but don’t worry. There’s only one question, and I’ll give you the answer. 

We’re all familiar with this famous line: “Damn the torpedoes, full speed ahead.” But who said it? Actually, no one, at least not using those precise words. Yet David Farragut, a Union naval officer during the Civil War, came damn close. 

It's worth noting that, on this date in 1862, a force under Farragut’s command captured the city and port of New Orleans. But that’s not when he uttered his famous line, or a version thereof. That happened in August 1864, as Farragut’s fleet of armored monitors and wooden ships entered rebel-held Mobile Bay, Alabama. 

When the lead monitor Tecumseh was demolished by a Confederate mine (also known as a torpedo back then), the Union ship Brooklyn came to a stop. That sent the line of Union ships drifting toward Confederate Fort Morgan, according to the web site of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

As disaster seemed imminent, Farragut, who was lashed to the rigging of his flagship, Hartford, gave the order for which he is now famous. He took his ship over the remaining mines, which did not explode. Most of the fleet followed.

Union forces then defeated the Confederate squadron of Franklin Buchanan. Three rebel forts surrendered and the Union controlled Mobile. 

So just what did Farragut say at that crucial moment after the Tecumseh was destroyed and the fleet hesitated? According to his son, who published The Life of David Glasgow Farragut, First Admiral of the United States Navy in 1879, Farragut addressed two of his subordinate officers this way: "Damn the torpedoes! Four bells! Captain Crayton, go ahead! Joucett, full speed!"
 

Photographer Paul Cyr gives us the best of Maine

April snow

pkcyr.com

New England's hundreds of National Historic Landmarks (245)



Anyone with an interest in American history is familiar with the National Register of Historic Places. It contains more than 85,000 sites, but only some 2,500 of them have been listed as National Historic Landmarks. New England is home to hundreds of these particularly significant structures, objects and places. They appear here alphabetically, by state. Descriptions condensed from Wikipedia.
Above:
"Hauled Up," 1937, by New England artist Russell Cheney, 1881-1945
The Great Seal of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

MASSACHUSETTS
Lydia Pinkham House, Lynn


This 1872 Second Empire house was the residence of Lydia Pinkham, whose herbal remedy for dysmenorrhea was one of the bestselling such medical products of the late 19th century.


Journalist H. L. Mencken and the presidency of Donald J. Trump


"As democracy is perfected, the office represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. We move toward a lofty ideal. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron."

July 26, 1920
H. L. Mencken, Baltimore Evening Sun
 ~ ~ ~
April 29, 2017
Just another great and glorious day with a downright moron adorning the White House.

Editorial cartoonists: keeping the legacy of Thomas Nast alive

by Mike Luckovich

Friday, April 28, 2017

The artful archive: a look at magazine covers through the years

2017

Photographer Paul Cyr gives us the best of Maine

Robin

pkcyr.com

New England's hundreds of National Historic Landmarks (244)



Anyone with an interest in American history is familiar with the National Register of Historic Places. It contains more than 85,000 sites, but only some 2,500 of them have been listed as National Historic Landmarks. New England is home to hundreds of these particularly significant structures, objects and places. They appear here alphabetically, by state. Descriptions condensed from Wikipedia.
Above:
"Hauled Up," 1937, by New England artist Russell Cheney, 1881-1945
The Great Seal of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

MASSACHUSETTS
Pierce-Highborn House, Boston

This is a rare pre-Georgian brick house, built circa 1711. It is next door to the Paul Revere House.