Sunday, November 18, 2018

Vintage Mags: a look back at old magazine covers, through 1969

1949

Today in the history of the American comic strip: November 18


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

11.18.1956: Frank Giaccia’s Johnny Reb and Billy Yank, a Civil War strip, gets its start. It ran for less than three years.

11.18.1985:
The acclaimed Calvin and Hobbes, Bill Watterson’s beloved strip starring a six-year-old boy and his (supposedly) stuffed tiger, debuts. Sometimes dubbed "the last great comic strip," it survived for a decade, until Watterson pulled the plug.

 
Calvin and Hobbes

Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.

"What is art but a way of seeing?" Saul Bellow

"Scorched Earth," 2018, Jacqueline Orr

Movie Posters, 1985: Two adults, please, and a large popcorn!


Editorial cartoonists: keeping the legacy of Thomas Nast alive

Tom Toles

Saturday, November 17, 2018

Vintage Mags: a look back at old magazine covers, through 1969

1950

Today in the history of the American comic strip: November 17


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

11.17.1904: Faith Burrows, a nationally syndicated cartoonist during the Jazz Age, is born.
 

11.17.1929: Johnny Gruelle unveils Brutus, an increasingly offbeat strip starring Brutus Dudd; his wife, Cleo; their dog, Julius Caesar; and their cat, Marc Antony. It ran until 1938.

11.17.2006: Fantagraphics Books releases the first volume in a set reprinting the complete run of E.C. Segar’s Thimble Theatre (dailies and color Sundays) featuring Popeye.
 
Brutus

Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.