Wednesday, July 17, 2019

Vintage Mags, 1916: a look back at old magazine covers

Today in the history of the American comic strip: July 17


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

7.17.1917: Mexican-American artist Gustavo "Gus" Arriola is born in Florence, Arizona. His strip Gordo introduced American readers to Mexican culture. Arriola won a Newspaper Comic Strip award from the National Cartoonists Society in 1965, eight years after he tied with Gasoline Alley's Frank King for the same award.

7.17.1971:
Garry Trudeau's Doonesbury avoids cancellation in a Macon, Georgia, newspaper, The Telegraph, thanks to a 27-22 win in a referendum.

7.17.2007: R. C. Harvey releases Meanwhile . . . , a biography of Milton Caniff, creator of Terry and the Pirates and Steve Canyon.

 
Terry and the Pirates

Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.

"What is art but a way of seeing?" Saul Bellow

"Water Lilies," 1914–1917, Claude Monet

Movie Posters, 1988: Two adults, please, and a large popcorn!


Editorial cartoonists: keeping the legacy of Thomas Nast alive

Joe Heller

Journalist H.L. Mencken and the presidency of Donald Trump


"As democracy is perfected, the office represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. We move toward a lofty ideal. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron."

 July 26, 1920
H. L. Mencken, Baltimore Evening Sun
 ~ ~ ~
July 17, 2019
 Another great and glorious day with a downright moron adorning the White House. 

Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Vintage Mags, 1965: a look back at old magazine covers

Today in the history of the American comic strip: July 16


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

7.16.1890: Carl Ed, the creator of Harold Teen, is born in Moline, Illinois. His strip debuted in 1919 under the title The Love Life of Harold Teen, and survived (with a name change) until 1959.


Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.