Sunday, September 25, 2016

The artful archive: a look at magazine covers through the years

November 20, 1989

New England's hundreds of National Historic Landmarks (29)



Anyone with an interest in American history is familiar with the National Register of Historic Places. It contains more than 85,000 sites, but only some 2,500 of them have been listed as National Historic Landmarks. New England is home to hundreds of these particularly significant structures, objects and places. They appear here alphabetically, by state. Descriptions condensed from Wikipedia.
Above:
"Hauled Up," 1937, by New England artist Russell Cheney, 1881-1945
The Great Seal of the State of Connecticut

CONNECTICUT
Litchfield Historic District, Litchfield 

Late 18th- and early 19th-century New England town; the state's first historic district.



Movie posters that are too good to forget (not that you'd want to)


Movies and their posters. Oftentimes, they are well-matched. But sometimes, a poster suggests more (or less) than the film delivers. So let’s accept these promotional gems on their own terms, as freestanding examples of commercial art that may or may not accurately reflect their “product.” I'll be posting a memorable example every day, for some time.

Editorial cartoonists: keeping the legacy of Thomas Nast alive

by Jeff Danziger

Saturday, September 24, 2016

The artful archive: a look at magazine covers through the years

August 1958

New England's hundreds of National Historic Landmarks (28)



Anyone with an interest in American history is familiar with the National Register of Historic Places. It contains more than 85,000 sites, but only some 2,500 of them have been listed as National Historic Landmarks. New England is home to hundreds of these particularly significant structures, objects and places. They appear here alphabetically, by state. Descriptions condensed from Wikipedia.
Above:
"Hauled Up," 1937, by New England artist Russell Cheney, 1881-1945
The Great Seal of the State of Connecticut

CONNECTICUT
L. A. Dunton (schooner), Mystic

Classic fishing schooner and one of the last sail-powered fishing vessels built (1921).



Movie posters that are too good to forget (not that you'd want to)


Movies and their posters. Oftentimes, they are well-matched. But sometimes, a poster suggests more (or less) than the film delivers. So let’s accept these promotional gems on their own terms, as freestanding examples of commercial art that may or may not accurately reflect their “product.” I'll be posting a memorable example every day, for some time.

Editorial cartoonists: keeping the legacy of Thomas Nast alive

by David Horsey

Friday, September 23, 2016

The artful archive: a look at magazine covers through the years

October 1924

New England's hundreds of National Historic Landmarks (27)



Anyone with an interest in American history is familiar with the National Register of Historic Places. It contains more than 85,000 sites, but only some 2,500 of them have been listed as National Historic Landmarks. New England is home to hundreds of these particularly significant structures, objects and places. They appear here alphabetically, by state. Descriptions condensed from Wikipedia.
Above:
"Hauled Up," 1937, by New England artist Russell Cheney, 1881-1945
The Great Seal of the State of Connecticut

CONNECTICUT
Kimberly Mansion, Glastonbury

Home of suffragists Abby and Julia Smith.



September 23, 1944: FDR defends "my little dog, Fala"

Fala and FDR at the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial in Washington

Every month produced its share of headlines during World War II, and September 1944 certainly was no exception. The Allies liberated Brussels and Antwerp that month. Germany lobbed a V2 rocket at London. The Battle of Peleliu, which would drag on for more than two months amid tremendous carnage, began. The Allies launched the ill-fated Operation Market Garden, the largest airborne assault in history.

September 1944 also is remembered for another, more lighthearted, reason. It was on Sept. 23 of that year that President Roosevelt delivered a speech in which he defended his Scottish Terrier, Fala.

Republicans were claiming that Roosevelt, having left Fala behind during a visit to the Aleutian Islands, sent the Navy to retrieve him. The story was false, but it gained enough traction to become a distraction during the 1944 presidential campaign, so Roosevelt took it on in his so-called Fala Speech. 
These Republican leaders have not been content with attacks on me, or my wife, or on my sons. No, not content with that, they now include my little dog, Fala.

Well, of course, I don’t resent attacks, and my family doesn’t resent attacks, but Fala does resent them.

You know, Fala is Scotch, and being a Scottie, as soon as he learned that the Republican fiction writers in Congress and out had concocted a story that I had left him behind on the Aleutian Islands and had sent a destroyer back to find him — at a cost to the taxpayers of two or three or eight or twenty million dollars — his Scotch soul was furious.

He has not been the same dog since.

I am accustomed to hearing malicious falsehoods about myself — such as that old, worm-eaten chestnut that I have represented myself as indispensable. But I think I have a right to resent, to object, to libelous statements about my dog.

Movie posters that are too good to forget (not that you'd want to)


Movies and their posters. Oftentimes, they are well-matched. But sometimes, a poster suggests more (or less) than the film delivers. So let’s accept these promotional gems on their own terms, as freestanding examples of commercial art that may or may not accurately reflect their “product.” I'll be posting a memorable example every day, for some time.

Editorial cartoonists: keeping the legacy of Thomas Nast alive

by David Horsey

Review: "Vita Brevis," Ruth Downie



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