Friday, September 21, 2018

Vintage Mags: a look back at old magazine covers, through 1969

1963

Today in the history of the American comic strip: September 21


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

9.21.1885: H.T. Webster is born in Parkersburg, West Virginia. His cartoon The Timid Soul introduced Caspar Milquetoast, whom Webster described as “the man who speaks softly and gets hit with a big stick.”

9.21.1893: Frank Willard, who gave us Moon Mullins (1923-1991), is born in Anna, Illinois. His strip depicted the lives of several lowbrow characters who live in a boardinghouse.


9.21.1949: Charles Boyce, the creator of Compu-toon, is born in Olive Branch, Mississippi. The comic ran in newspapers from 1994 to 1997.

9.21.1971: Zonker Harris shows up for the first time in Garry Trudeau's Doonesbury, which debuted as a daily newspaper strip in 1970. 


9.21.1974: Paul Robinson, best known for his strip Etta Kett, dies in Glen Ridge, New Jersey, at 76. The long-running cartoon (1925-1974) about a teenager began as a way to teach teens about etiquette, hence its name.


Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.

"What is art but a way of seeing?" Saul Bellow

“Late Afternoon, New York, Winter,” 1900, Childe Hassam

Movie Posters, 1962: Two adults, please, and a large popcorn!


Editorial cartoonists: keeping the legacy of Thomas Nast alive

David Horsey

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Vintage Mags: a look back at old magazine covers, through 1969

1929

Today in the history of the American comic strip: September 20


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

9.20.1901: Gus Edson, co-creator of Dondi (1955-1986), is born in Cincinnati, Ohio.

9.20.1920: Winnie Winkle makes its debut as Winnie Winkle the Breadwinner. The strip survived until 1996.


9.20.1962: Bill Amend, the creator of FoxTrot, is born in Northampton, Massachusetts. He was named 2006 Outstanding Cartoonist of the Year by the National Cartoonists Society.


9.20.1964: Ben Casey, already in print as a daily strip, adds a Sunday installment. Both strips ended in 1966.


9.20.1965: Bob Weber debuts Moose, later known as Moose and Molly. Moose is a lazy, out-of-work loafer and Molly is his extremely tolerant wife.
 

9.20.1972: William Ritt, co-creator of the Brick Bradford science fiction strip, which ran from 1933 to 1987, dies at 70.

9.20.2010: Ed Stein unveils Freshly Squeezed, a cartoon about multi-generational families.


Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.