Sunday, February 25, 2018

Vintage Mags: a look back at old magazine covers, through 1979

1977

Today in the history of the American comic strip: February 25


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

2.25.1903: Darrell McClure, who worked on Little Annie Rooney from 1930 to 1966, is born in Ukiah, California. The strip about a young orphaned girl and her dog Zero was launched in 1927, after Little Orphan Annie became a hit.

2.25.1929: Illustrator and cartoonist Arnold Roth is born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 1959, he introduced Poor Arnold’s Almanac, which ran until 1961, and again from 1989 to 1990. John Updike once wrote: “All cartoonists are geniuses, but Arnold Roth is especially so.” Roth is a member of the National Cartoonists Society Hall of Fame.

2.25.1973: Terry and the Pirates ends its run of close to 40 years. Creator Milton Caniff launched the adventure strip in 1934 and left it in 1946, but successor George Wunder kept it going until 1973.



Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.

The best of all six New England states in memorable photographs

Madison, New Hampshire

Movie Posters: Two adults, please, and a large buttered popcorn!


1975

Editorial cartoonists: keeping the legacy of Thomas Nast alive

David Horsey

Journalist H. L. Mencken and the presidency of Donald J. Trump


"As democracy is perfected, the office represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. We move toward a lofty ideal. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron."

 July 26, 1920
H. L. Mencken, Baltimore Evening Sun
 ~ ~ ~
February 25, 2018
 Another great and glorious day with a downright moron adorning the White House. 

Saturday, February 24, 2018

Vintage Mags: a look back at old magazine covers, through 1979

1952

Today in the history of the American comic strip: February 24


American cartoonists and writers may not have invented the comic strip, but some argue that the comics, as we know them today, are an American creation. Clearly, the United States has played an outsize role in the development of this underappreciated art form.

2.24.1954: Jim Borgman, the co-creator of Zits (with Jerry Scott), is born in Cincinnati, Ohio. Borgman was the editorial cartoonist at The Cincinnati Enquirer from 1976 to 2008. Zits stars high schooler Jerry Scott as he copes with family, friends, romance and school.


Most of the information listed here from one day to the next comes from two online sites -- Wikipedia, and Don Markstein's Toonopedia -- as well as 100 Years of American Newspaper Comics, edited by Maurice Horn. Note that my focus is on American newspaper comic strips (and the occasional foreign strip that gained popularity in the United States). Thus, comic books and exclusively online comics are not included here.