Monday, March 27, 2017

The artful archive: a look at magazine covers through the years

October 6, 2015

Roots: A memento to remember Dad by

Today is my father’s birthday. Leonide Carrière (that last "e" got dropped somewhere along the line) died, at 90, in January 2003, and although more than a decade has passed since then, I still think of him every morning.

That’s because a daily ritual always brings Dad to mind. It involves a memento of my father — a two-inch-long feather carved from moose bone. The feather is attached to a thin black cord, and every morning without fail, I pull it over my head and tuck it into my shirt.

My father didn’t give me this token, nor was he with me when I bought it. But I think of it as Dad’s feather. That's partly because I acquired it at a Maine crafts show only two months before he died, but primarily because it reminded me of my father and his heritage the very first time I spotted it.

Both of my parents were Franco-American; both traced their ancestry to the earliest settlers of New France (modern-day Québec). But Dad also had a bit of Indian ancestry. Perhaps that's why he always had a special place in his heart for native people.

My father was a direct descendant of Jean Nicolet, the 17th-century French explorer who is sometimes called the Father of Wisconsin because he was the first European to reach Lake Michigan and what is now Green Bay. Nicolet had an illegitimate daughter (“enfant naturel” in the French records) with a member of Canada’s Nipissing tribe. His partner’s name is lost to us, but he gave their child his surname.

It seems Nicolet brought his daughter, Madeleine dite Euphrosine Nicolet, with him when he returned to Québec. There, he married a Frenchwoman; Madeleine married a Frenchman. If you go back nine generations, Madeleine was Dad’s grandmother.

To me, that bone feather symbolizes not only my father, but his link to Madeleine and her mother’s people. A small black bead that came with Dad’s feather is long gone, and the cord has become frayed from daily wear. But I suspect the feather itself will outlast me, as it did my father.

If Madeleine dite Euphrosine Nicolet could peer into the 21st century from her perch back in the 17th, perhaps she would view that as a good thing.

New England's hundreds of National Historic Landmarks (212)



Anyone with an interest in American history is familiar with the National Register of Historic Places. It contains more than 85,000 sites, but only some 2,500 of them have been listed as National Historic Landmarks. New England is home to hundreds of these particularly significant structures, objects and places. They appear here alphabetically, by state. Descriptions condensed from Wikipedia.
Above:
"Hauled Up," 1937, by New England artist Russell Cheney, 1881-1945
The Great Seal of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

MASSACHUSETTS
Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston

The original building for Massachusetts General Hospital, one of the nation's earliest public hospitals, houses the Ether Dome, also a National Historic Landmark.


Journalist H. L. Mencken and the presidency of Donald J. Trump


"As democracy is perfected, the office represents, more and more closely, the inner soul of the people. We move toward a lofty ideal. On some great and glorious day the plain folks of the land will reach their heart's desire at last, and the White House will be adorned by a downright moron."

H. L. Mencken, July 26, 1920, Baltimore Evening Sun
~ ~ ~
March 27, 2017
The nightmare continues.

Editorial cartoonists: keeping the legacy of Thomas Nast alive

by Jim Morin

Sunday, March 26, 2017

The artful archive: a look at magazine covers through the years

March 1973

Photographer Benjamin Williamson gives us the best of Maine

Spring Will Come, Just Not Quite Yet

www.benjamin-williamson.artistwebsites.com

New England's hundreds of National Historic Landmarks (211)



Anyone with an interest in American history is familiar with the National Register of Historic Places. It contains more than 85,000 sites, but only some 2,500 of them have been listed as National Historic Landmarks. New England is home to hundreds of these particularly significant structures, objects and places. They appear here alphabetically, by state. Descriptions condensed from Wikipedia.
Above:
"Hauled Up," 1937, by New England artist Russell Cheney, 1881-1945
The Great Seal of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts

MASSACHUSETTS
Massachusetts Hall, Harvard University, Cambridge


This building is the oldest surviving building (1718–20) on the campus of Harvard University and the second oldest academic building in the nation.


Editorial cartoonists: keeping the legacy of Thomas Nast alive

by Nick Anderson